New CD "e Motion"!

Hey Everyone! New CD!

3 comments

  • Debbie Schrader

    Debbie Schrader Marco Island

    Beautiful voices and great songs. It is a hit!

    Beautiful voices and great songs. It is a hit!

  • Kelly O'Neil

    Kelly O'Neil Zebulon, NC

    Album Title:  Right Direction (Rave Song Records) Reviewers Name: Kelly O’Neil Rating: 5 stars Review Summary: Age is just a number; music is eternal Review: Popular music genres have changed over the past forty years, though not everything that made the Top 40 could be considered good. The bandmates of The Willing have come full circle in their musical careers from living and touring in the heyday of 1970s rockdom to solo or side careers to back with the original sextet. Right Direction is the second album the reunited musicians have released, following 2010’s well received Unfinished Business. The Willing has the unique advantage of not only having six seasoned professionals, but five of these Illinois gentlemen contribute to the songwriting duties. This guarantees that each song possesses a different spark and is performed with polished vigor and style. A whirlwind opens “No Water” written and sung by guitarist Rich Wigstone. The strummed guitar peppered with banjo portray a sense of urgency joined by a dramatic slow variation of the melody by the electric guitar in the bridge. Reminiscent of Kansas, the balance between the voice and instruments is excellent. The “ho, ho, ho” though could have been substituted for some other substantial vocal or instrumental exclamation. Wigstone’s affinity for weighty vocal snippets is prominent in the amusing “Go Away”. The simplistic rollicking melody and sporadic piano banging is held together by the deadpan unison male voices stating, “Go away” or “toodle-loo”. The title track however features much more aurally pleasing piano work and harkens back to The Eagles, before hell froze over. Keyboardist Dan Smith’s songs have an alternate vibe. “Who’s Gonna Love Me” has a bluesy recitative in the verses, like the Jars of Clay song “Sad Clown,” alternating with heavily stacked vocal chords in the chorus ala Brian Wilson. The electric guitar then adds another layer making it a truly dynamic piece. Smith’s other original contribution is “When You Can’t Remember Who You Are Anymore” which also features awesome vocal harmonic blending and occasional synthesized brass accents in the extended coda. Bassist David Angel composed and sings lead on “This Love” which embodies warmth and happiness accented by glockenspiel. He is joined by keyboardist John Krahenbuhl on vocals for “Live for Today,” an upbeat tune with a crisp layered vocal delivery. The drums could be tighter and sound a bit muffled or mushy, however the mandolin work is well done. Guitarist Chris Gough wrote “The Great Divide” with Krahenbuhl singing lead. The piece is not as produced as other songs on Right Direction having a rather homey feel, like friends jamming together in a log cabin on the side of a mountain. The lead guitar solo in the bridge needs to come up in the mix, especially when prompted by the vocals, “Help me!” Krahenbuhl’s writing contributions to the album include the soulful “Alive” which is the best produced and most full-bodied work in this collection. Channeling Stephen Stills, it is easy to become immersed in the exquisite vocal blend and electric guitar countermelody. “Time” is fantastic tune to end the album with its different thematic materials, prominent electric guitar and bluesy vocals, evident of Neil Young’s influence, though thankfully without the whiny singing. The Willing is a testament to the true staying power of rock and roll where musicians write and perform their own works to perfection. At this point, the sextet may simply be playing for their own amusement but it is definitely for the enjoyment of all.

    Album Title:  Right Direction (Rave Song Records)
    Reviewers Name: Kelly O’Neil
    Rating: 5 stars
    Review Summary: Age is just a number; music is eternal
    Review:
    Popular music genres have changed over the past forty years, though not everything that made the Top 40 could be considered good. The bandmates of The Willing have come full circle in their musical careers from living and touring in the heyday of 1970s rockdom to solo or side careers to back with the original sextet. Right Direction is the second album the reunited musicians have released, following 2010’s well received Unfinished Business. The Willing has the unique advantage of not only having six seasoned professionals, but five of these Illinois gentlemen contribute to the songwriting duties. This guarantees that each song possesses a different spark and is performed with polished vigor and style.
    A whirlwind opens “No Water” written and sung by guitarist Rich Wigstone. The strummed guitar peppered with banjo portray a sense of urgency joined by a dramatic slow variation of the melody by the electric guitar in the bridge. Reminiscent of Kansas, the balance between the voice and instruments is excellent. The “ho, ho, ho” though could have been substituted for some other substantial vocal or instrumental exclamation. Wigstone’s affinity for weighty vocal snippets is prominent in the amusing “Go Away”. The simplistic rollicking melody and sporadic piano banging is held together by the deadpan unison male voices stating, “Go away” or “toodle-loo”. The title track however features much more aurally pleasing piano work and harkens back to The Eagles, before hell froze over.
    Keyboardist Dan Smith’s songs have an alternate vibe. “Who’s Gonna Love Me” has a bluesy recitative in the verses, like the Jars of Clay song “Sad Clown,” alternating with heavily stacked vocal chords in the chorus ala Brian Wilson. The electric guitar then adds another layer making it a truly dynamic piece. Smith’s other original contribution is “When You Can’t Remember Who You Are Anymore” which also features awesome vocal harmonic blending and occasional synthesized brass accents in the extended coda.
    Bassist David Angel composed and sings lead on “This Love” which embodies warmth and happiness accented by glockenspiel. He is joined by keyboardist John Krahenbuhl on vocals for “Live for Today,” an upbeat tune with a crisp layered vocal delivery. The drums could be tighter and sound a bit muffled or mushy, however the mandolin work is well done.

    Guitarist Chris Gough wrote “The Great Divide” with Krahenbuhl singing lead. The piece is not as produced as other songs on Right Direction having a rather homey feel, like friends jamming together in a log cabin on the side of a mountain. The lead guitar solo in the bridge needs to come up in the mix, especially when prompted by the vocals, “Help me!”
    Krahenbuhl’s writing contributions to the album include the soulful “Alive” which is the best produced and most full-bodied work in this collection. Channeling Stephen Stills, it is easy to become immersed in the exquisite vocal blend and electric guitar countermelody. “Time” is fantastic tune to end the album with its different thematic materials, prominent electric guitar and bluesy vocals, evident of Neil Young’s influence, though thankfully without the whiny singing.
    The Willing is a testament to the true staying power of rock and roll where musicians write and perform their own works to perfection. At this point, the sextet may simply be playing for their own amusement but it is definitely for the enjoyment of all.

  • Strutter Magazine

    Strutter Magazine Holland

    The Willing 'Right direction' (Rave Song Records/USA Import) Out of Chicago comes The Willing, a band formed way back in the 1970s and despite they did not record anything during this period, they toured throughout the Midwest performing original songs & covers by Crosby Stills Nash & Young, The Eagles, The Moody Blues & The Beatles. However, they broke up in the late 1970s and 3 members (Kent Cooper, Rich Wigstone & David Angel) went on to form CBS recording artists The Boyzz and later on The B’zz, with whom they recorded 2 great hard rock albums. Eventually the band got together again and with 5 songwriters on board nowadays (Rich Wigstone (Guitar / Vocals), John Krahenbuhl (Keyboards / Vocals), Chris Gough (Guitar), Dan Smith (Keyboards / Vocals), David Angel (Bass / Vocals), & Kent Cooper (Drums / Vocals)), the band is now sounding better than ever. A couple of years ago they released Unfinished business and now follow it up with Right direction, a very strong album that combines elements of typical 70s Classic American rock/pop, Westcoast and Americana with those typical close harmonyvocals, sounding a lot like the guys from Venice and The Eagles of course. 11 songs are included on the band’s new CD, starting with No Water, a fantastic uptempo westcoast/aor 1970s style tune, with superstrong vocals and beautiful melodies a la Venice. The album has enough diversity to keep you entertained, while other recommended tracks are Who's Gonna Love Me (great laid-back slow tune with a sorta 1950s shuffle, great harmonies a la Venice again), The Right Direction (beautiful classic westcoast ballad, of course Eagles and Venice again, superstrong tune), Alive (nice ballad ish tune, even a bit proggy a la Pink Floyd, in typical 1970s length of 6 minutes playing time) and Time (good bluesy rocker). Especially the harmonyvocals and fantastic clean melodic lead vocals make this album of The Willing a highly recommended record and for fans of Poco, Venice, The Eagles, Calexico, Orleans, etc. etc., this is definitely something you need to check out a.s.a.p. at: www.thewillingband.com and www.ravesongrecords.com (Points: 8.3 out of 10)

    The Willing 'Right direction' (Rave Song Records/USA Import)

    Out of Chicago comes The Willing, a band formed way back in the 1970s and despite they did not record anything during this period, they toured throughout the Midwest performing original songs & covers by Crosby Stills Nash & Young, The Eagles, The Moody Blues & The Beatles. However, they broke up in the late 1970s and 3 members (Kent Cooper, Rich Wigstone & David Angel) went on to form CBS recording artists The Boyzz and later on The B’zz, with whom they recorded 2 great hard rock albums. Eventually the band got together again and with 5 songwriters on board nowadays (Rich Wigstone (Guitar / Vocals), John Krahenbuhl (Keyboards / Vocals), Chris Gough (Guitar), Dan Smith (Keyboards / Vocals), David Angel (Bass / Vocals), & Kent Cooper (Drums / Vocals)), the band is now sounding better than ever. A couple of years ago they released Unfinished business and now follow it up with Right direction, a very strong album that combines elements of typical 70s Classic American rock/pop, Westcoast and Americana with those typical close harmonyvocals, sounding a lot like the guys from Venice and The Eagles of course. 11 songs are included on the band’s new CD, starting with No Water, a fantastic uptempo westcoast/aor 1970s style tune, with superstrong vocals and beautiful melodies a la Venice. The album has enough diversity to keep you entertained, while other recommended tracks are Who's Gonna Love Me (great laid-back slow tune with a sorta 1950s shuffle, great harmonies a la Venice again), The Right Direction (beautiful classic westcoast ballad, of course Eagles and Venice again, superstrong tune), Alive (nice ballad ish tune, even a bit proggy a la Pink Floyd, in typical 1970s length of 6 minutes playing time) and Time (good bluesy rocker). Especially the harmonyvocals and fantastic clean melodic lead vocals make this album of The Willing a highly recommended record and for fans of Poco, Venice, The Eagles, Calexico, Orleans, etc. etc., this is definitely something you need to check out a.s.a.p. at: www.thewillingband.com and www.ravesongrecords.com

    (Points: 8.3 out of 10)

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